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New Year, New Rules – Three Steps to Keep 2018 Resolutions Simple

 

Seasons exist for a reason. And, yet sometimes they are annoyingly predictable. When it comes to New Year’s resolutions, there are a few different camps. Some folks love the tradition, some ignore it, and others despise it. A few of us sign up simply to partake in goal-setting without ever expecting follow-through. And, an even fewer number (8%) of resolution setters actually stick to their goals.

Considering all this, is there a better way to start 2018? At Omni Social Media, we would like to be a bit more pragmatic. So here are 3 realistic rules for approaching your 2018 resolutions and business goals.

 

1. Keep the unforgettable.

Each year does not require re-inventing the wheel nor does it truly provide clean slate. There is no such thing as a blank slate. Letting go – yes. Forgiving – yes. But, it’s nearly impossible to forget the things we didn’t follow through on or ignore the ideas never pursued. The phrase, “we all have baggage” exists for a reason. But, with a little effort, we can create a fresh mindset as we approach the new year.

Start by making a long list of all the unfinished projects, ignored ideas, or poorly executed plans. Cross out what is no longer relevant. Forgive yourself or your team for whatever disappointment remains. Let it go. Then, eliminate what is no longer a realistic priority. Holding on to ideas that simply don’t fit can consume too much energy and prevent progress. Take all that is left on the list and carry it into the new year. Keep the unforgettable, and leave the rest in 2017.

 

2. Be Selective.

After carrying over what you cannot bring yourself to let go, be very selective about what you add. It is important that we are intentional. What we pursue shapes who we become. So, identify how our new goals will direct our energy. And, acknowledge that less is more. You can add later. Are the new goals realistic within the context of what is already on your plate? Ask yourself tons of questions, before committing a new goal to your 2018 list, including:

 

  • How does this goal help?
  • Why is it in consideration?
  • Is this a short-term or long-term goal?
  • Is this something I can finish in 2018?
  • Who will execute this goal?
  • If this is on my “plate”, where will I find the time to complete this goal?
  • Are there other things that I’m willing to give up to achieve this goal?
  • Will I need help with this goal?
  • Is this goal connected or interdependent on any other goals on my plate?
  • How disappointed will I be if this goal is not met?
  • Is this something that can wait?
  • Is this a goal that is motivated internally or externally?

 

3. Prioritize goals strategically.

We are dreamers and we can get pretty lofty with our ideas, which can prime us for failure. But, if we prioritize intentionally, we can fuel future successes. It is often said that it’s important to include achievable goals and tasks on our lists so that we see progress that encourages us.

Evaluate your “carry-over” list, review your hopefully short “new” list, and then order them purposefully. Organize less demanding goals and more demanding goals in a way that helps you see overall progress on your list. Get out the calendar and set deadlines for each, including benchmarks for longer term goals.

Ultimately, keeping the simpler and easily achieved goals at the top of your daily and weekly lists, will help you to stay motivated with long-term or more challenging resolutions.

“What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” – Zig Ziglar

The new year can be a productive season, if we have a clear sense of our current context, we set realistic expectations, and we keep it simple.

Try out these 3 rules this year and let us know what you’re prioritizing for 2018!

About Athena Brockman

Athena loves bookstores, stripes, foodstagrams, and personality tests. She is a writer, wife, mom of two, and former political staffer with degrees in political science and journalism from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.
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